Network, Network, Network

START HERE: If utilizing LinkedIn to network, start by signing up for LinkedIn’s Career Premium site which gives you access to multiple inmails. You can cancel it when you no longer need it. You are allowed 3 inmails (direct inmailing without “connecting” first.) If you need more, get the “Business Premium” membership instead which gives you 15 inmails.  *Sometimes it let’s you inmail more*.  You can always upgrade if needed.  You could also target hiring managers by finding their email on company websites. If you are able to do this, I think that is even better than LinkedIn. But it is clearly up to you.   Make sure you keep notes of your exchanges with contacts in your Strategize A & B List step.LinkedIn has recently stated that 85% jobs are acquired through some sort of networking. Even in if you are an introvert, these techniques will work for you. Just make sure that you start your morning carving out time to networking for job opportunities.

Depending on your time frame of when you need to get a job, make it a goal to reach out to at least 3 people at the beginning of every day. Increase that amount if you need to be aggressive about getting a job. The reality is that when you search for a job, you have to sell your self well. This is difficult for people who are not used to selling, but a critical concept to embrace. Try not to think too much about the process of this. Just enjoy it and think of it as a new opportunity to explore other companies and meet new people. Utilize a coach for support and additional strategies.

1) Personal Connections

Network to personal connections via text or email, and if email,  attach your resume.

An email example: Mass email/inmail to a group of people you know personally, LinkedIn connections, any relevant professional groups or associations you belong to, or Facebook friends if you feel comfortable doing so:

 ” Hi ____,  Hope you are well. I am currently seeking a position in _________, for a ______ type of company.  If you know of a position like this or know of anyone that could point me in the right direction. I would greatly appreciate it!
Targeted email/inmail to people who are working at a company or in your industry of interest:
 ” Hi ____,  Hope you are well. I am currently seeking a position in _________, for a ______ type of company. I see that you work in this industry (or for that company). Do you know if there are any positions open or can you point me in the right direction of someone who might be able to help me?  I would greatly appreciate it!

2) Hiring Managers

Network to possible hiring managers of the positions you are seeking using LinkedIn Premium (or any other method that is appropriate for your industry). Most of my clients use LinkedIn Premium memberships to get access to hiring managers in targeted industries and company sizes.

To find out more and sign up for LinkedIn Premium. Even if the monthly costs seem high if it allows you to quickly research who you need. Use it for a month or two until you get a job, and then cancel it, it will make your job search easier. It allows you to directly inmail someone instead of asking to connect with them first before you can inmail them. Once you have found potential companies to apply to, see if you can reach out to a hiring manager or HR department. You can do this on LinkedIn by searching the company name and a title that would logically reflect the position above you who would be a hiring manager. If it’s a small company, you can look up the company and then choose “People” in the search option. Another option would be to search the actual company website outside of LinkedIn. This is a good idea anyhow because you can look at the company’s mission and vision, as well as recent news, and it gives you some information when you reach out the hiring manager you will be targeting.

Once you have targeted companies, and have found the potential hiring manager for that company, reach out to them, but you may not hear back from them.The goal is to get them to take note of your name and the value you can bring to this position. 

An example of how you can reach out to potential hiring managers for POSTED POSITIONS:

They generally can not respond, but the point is to get your name and value in front of them in a professional way. It also shows initiation.

 Dear [Recipient Name]:

Paragraph #1- what you have noticed that is amazing about this company from their website or mission statement and the posted position you are seeking.

Your company is unique in that… I love the work that… I am submitting my resume and application for your XYZ position. I understand that the protocol is that we don’t speak before your selection and interviewing process, but perhaps you could keep an eye out for my resume if any information below appeals to you?

Paragraph #2- what you see is their pain (from job description, etc.) and how you can solve their pain.

As you will see from the enclosed resume, I have more than [number] years of experience in the field of [area of professional expertise]. My resume shows that I have been consistently rewarded for hard work with promotions and increased responsibilities. These rewards are a direct result of my expertise in [area of professional expertise], my commitment to personal and professional excellence, and my excellent written and oral communication skills.

Another option for Paragraph #2 could be to write one paragraph story about how you solve a company’s pain or have a unique solution with your expertise and skills.

Paragraph #3-Your specific value statements you worked on in Brand & Market of your roadmap

Here are some of the ways I can be of value to [company name]:

Value 1 Statement

Value 2 Statement

Value 3 Statement

Value 4 Statement

Closing Paragraph #4-wrap it up with call-to-action

I appreciate your time and wish you the best in finding the right candidate for the position. I know that process can be time-consuming. If my talents are a good fit for the position, I hope that we can talk in the near future.

Best to you,

Your name

If you have the ability to write this with humor, wit, and professionalism, then please add personality to this email.



An example of how you can reach out to potential hiring managers to inquire about any possible positions.

Though the data is hard to pin down, at least half of jobs available are never posted. That is why it is so important for you to start connecting with people- and email and inmails are the easiest way to get that going. The goal here is to connect via inmail and to try to have at least a 10-minute quick conversation to establish a human-to-human connection and get the ball rolling. You want to try to get them on the phone ultimately, or even in person and discuss the business needs of the hiring manager to see if there is a fit with the value that you can bring to the table. If the hiring manager has nothing available, see if he/she knows of anyone else that might need someone with your talents and strengths.

Below is a two-part email (in case there is no first response).

Message #1: 

Dear [Recipient Name]:

Paragraph #1- what you have noticed that is amazing about this company from their website or mission statement and what position you are seeking.

Your company is unique in that… I love the work that… I am looking for XYZ position.

Paragraph #2- what you see is their pain (from job description, etc.) and how you can solve their pain.

As you will see from the enclosed resume, I have more than [number] years of experience in the field of [area of professional expertise]. My resume shows that I have been consistently rewarded for hard work with promotions and increased responsibilities. These rewards are a direct result of my expertise in [area of professional expertise], my commitment to personal and professional excellence, and my excellent written and oral communication skills.

Option 2 could be to write one paragraph story about how you solve a company’s pain or have a unique solution with your expertise and skills

Paragraph #3-Your specific value statements

Here are some of the ways I can be of value to [company name]:

-Value 1 Statement

-Value 2 Statement

-Value 3 Statement

-Value 4 Statement

Closing Paragraph #4

I would love the opportunity to talk with you for 10 minutes about your company and any future needs. Do you have a minute to talk via phone this week or next?

Best to you,

Your name

If you have the ability to write this with humor, wit, and professionalism, then please add personality to this email.


Message #2:

Dear [Recipient Name]:

I just wanted to try to reach out to you again to see if you had any time to talk about any future positions you might know of at [Company Name]. I love what [Company Name] has been doing XYZ and I am looking for the following position.

Add humor or wit here if you feel comfortable doing so.

I know life gets busy so please just keep my name in number in mind if your company has any needs that I can fill with my skills and experience:

Value 1 Statement

Value 2 Statement

Value 3 Statement

Value 4 Statement

Also if you know of anyone else that might need someone with skills and talents, please let me know. Your company is on the top of my list. If there are no open positions at this time, I would definitely like to check back in with you in the future, if that is ok with you? My number is xxx-xxx-xxxx.

Best to you,

 Your name

3) Reach Out to People Who Have Worked Previously at the Companies that Interest You

Search for the company name, position, and location in LinkedIn and see if anyone comes up that no longer works there, but worked in the department in which you are interested. Try to reach out to them via inmail on LinkedIn, and ask to see if you can just have a ten-minute call to ask them about that company. The purpose of this is to “vet” the department and company that you are pursuing. Maybe you will receive only a 20% response rate when you inquire, but it can be extremely valuable sometimes. It can provide you “insider” knowledge into the culture and viability of a company, and perhaps if the person left on good terms, he/she would allow you to use their name as a reference when contacting the hiring manager. “Jeff said that I should reach out to you in regards to ….”  You would be surprised how often this can actually be a fruitful endeavor.Here is an example of an inmail you could send out to someone who is no longer working at the company, but who could give you a name to contact, or their feedback about their experience to help you “vet” the company:

Message : 

Hello _____, I am reaching out to you because I am interested in working for (Company) in (state position), and I was wondering if you would be willing to talk for 10 minutes just to give me feedback on your experience working there? I would greatly appreciate any input you could give me, and would value your time and keep the call short. Please let me know if this would be possible, and if so, what would be a good time to call. Alternatively, if you are short on time, would you mind just answering a few quick questions:

  1. Did you like working for this company? Why or why not?
  2. Do you know anything about the department or position I am interested in for this company? Do you have any advice that would be helpful for me to reach out to someone there?
  3. Do you know the hiring manager for that area?  If so, could you give me a name so I could directly contact this person?

I greatly appreciate any help you could give to me.

Best,
Your Name

On average our clients receive about a 25% response rate to reaching out to people. Don’t be discouraged. This is normal.
Remember reach out to 3-5 people a day. It’s just a necessary hoop. Embrace the good pieces of it– meeting new people, exploring new office cultures, and making new connections.

  1. Again, LinkedIn is the first place to focus your efforts and make sure you are optimized with the right keywords.  Check out this infographic below by Career Glider. Did you know that 79 percent of recruiters hire through LinkedIn, and of those who use it, more than 90 percent search for, contact and screen candidates based on their profiles on the site? Post blogs on your industry and share relevant information. Stay active.
  2. Even if you don’t tweet, consider it. Twitter is a great place to meet employees and high-level executives. You’d be surprised how many C-level executives run their own Twitter, and are open to having a conversation with you because it is a great place to listen to what people are saying about your future company.
  3. Utilize Facebook by clicking on “home” on the top right and to the right of your profile photo on the left side, click on “edit profile” and fill in any relevant recruiter information and keywords like your current position.  You can find professional networks, classified people as “friends” or as “professional” or “work”.  Find out more specifics here if you really want to dive into Facebook: “4 Ways To Use Facebook To Find A Job” by Susan Adams.
  4. Check out professional meetups online at MeetupLook at the list of participants ahead of time and see if you can focus your efforts on meeting a specific hanful of people.
  5. Apparently, 83 percent of job seekers are currently on the popular social networkMost employers and recruiters want to know that you utilize social networking somehow because it typically shows that you are well-connected or connecting well. There is recruitment software now that aggregates all of the social media that a candidate is accessing. See image to the right of a candidates example of social media usage for him and his consulting company (that is why there are duplicates).  Social Network Example Utilize our Social Networking button on the left side to easily access a number of sites. No matter what your age, make an active effort to delete or untag any questionable past content, and ensure that make personal content private. To make yourself searchable for hiring managers, make public your employment information, location and professional skills/interests. Facebook is great for giving hiring managers insight into who you are.  It can also deter them.  No matter what, in today’s job market, being active on social media is a critical part of promoting your personal brand and can convey you as a thought leader.
    Infographic

    CareerGlider has a great infographic about social media recruiting. Click on image to see full infographic.

Try the following methods if you are not making headway:

  1.  Make sure you are truly in the “in it to win it” mode of networking.  This means that you are being extremely proactive and positive (not overtly aggressive) about networking for your job.  Companies want people that are positive,  adaptable, can perform and put themselves out there. They want people that can sell themselves well with confidence.  Many, if not most of us are not comfortable with doing this, but the key here is to put yourself out there.  Think of it as a growth opportunity.  Even once you get a job, you will still have to continuously sell your value in order to get promotions and grow in your career. Push the envelope for yourself in this realm. Channel your “inner superhero” or someone you greatly admire and get out there to make things happen. You can’t just have one toe in the water.  Job searching is tied to positivity and making things happen.  Many people want to help others. You just need to ask.
  2. Try changing up your networking format by making your resume irresistibly beautiful, your inmails humorous, or write articles for LinkedIn about your industry (become a thought leader). Reach out to executives on Twitter, and 
  3. Continue networking.  Increase the number of people you network with daily on LinkedIn or whatever means is working the best for you.
  4. Reach out to professional associations and meetups with your industry and go to their functions, bring your business card and network, network, network.  Meetup can be helpful because you can see who will be attending these events and actually seek them out when you are there.
  5.  Look into temporary, part-time, consulting or “pro-bono” work to get your foot in the door somewhere.  Often if you have been out of work or you are seeking a position in a competitive industry, these are great ways to get your foot in the door.
  6. Hit the “startup” networks or organizations in your area. Another way to getting started when you are difficulty finding a position.

Here’s a starting place to look for networking opportunities for professional or job searching purposes.